The Reasons Why The Nourish a Child’s Education is Important too

Over 2.05 million students are now learning at home instead of in a classroom. The reasons why is a shocking 73% who say they are doing homeschool because they are dissatisfied with how public schools are being ran.

Most parents don’t think twice when August rolls around and it’s time for kids to go back to school. Many parents work during the day, and they have to pay for a babysitter during their work week. I’ve even seen it so bad that a single woman was completely broke after paying her bare minimum bills, the babysitter, and gas. That would definitely be the con in having your children attend public school. Another con would be that you have to worry about bullying. Watching the news every day you’ll see Elementary students shooting up schools and things like that are pretty scary. The biggest pro when it comes to having your child in a public school is the fact that a teacher, who spent many hours in school learning to teach children of that age spent the entire day with your little angels.

Well, what kind of profession will my child go into if they stay at home for school? Will it make them fat and lazy and then I’ll be stuck with a couch potatoes? Statistics say that 17.3% of the men go on to become an accountant or an engineer. 169% shockingly go on to become a professor, doctor, or a lawyer. Yet, according to the natural assessment of children’s education, only 13% of public school students are proficient in U.S. History. That’s odd, isn’t that where we live?

If you come home from work early and usually take a nap before going to get the kids off of the bus you can kiss that nap good-bye. If you work at home, like me, and you take the kids up to the bus stop and then come back home and take a nap, you can kiss those naps good-bye. One of my favorite pros about homeschooling is the fact there are no more early morning rushing around. Do you remember these,

“Come on guys, you’re going to be late. Get up!”

“Your breakfast is getting cold.”

What do you mean you can’t find half of your books? Where did you last have them?”

“You have a test today, and you went out this weekend to have fun, but didn’t stud?”

“You’re grounded”

“You’re grounded”

“Why didn’t you put your clothes that you wanted washed in the washer this weekend until waiting until Monday morning?”

Now, they can go into a quiet room in their pajamas and do their school work.

Have you ever had a student come home and tell you that their teacher is out to get them? That they are giving them bad grades for no reason? Well, guess what with you being the Learning Coach, you want your child to do the best that they’ve done, so you’re not going to let that happen.

Honestly, in my opinion, homeschool and virtual schools are the newest things that are going to take over. Pretty soon, there won’t be many public schools left, except for those parents who’s children are too young to stay home. You get to learn as well.

I don’t know about you, but the older I get, the more I feel like I’m becoming dumber. When I began helping my 3rd and 5th grader, I was amazed at how much I forgot. This makes me feel better, and when the kids talk to me about what they learned in school that day, instead of pretending like I understand, I can actually talk with them, and we have learning family time.

The last thing I wanted to mention is about projects. How many times have your child brought home a piece of cardboard and said, I have to do a project. “Well, what kind?” You ask them. They look at you with that blank look on their face like you should know this, and say… “I don’t know”. Well, if you read ahead a day or two in their lesson books, you’ll know what they are going to be doing, so there’s going to be no confusion what-so ever. Home schooling, and virtual school is definitely the way to go.

I recently found some really amazing facts that you’d never guess if you didn’t see the proof in front of you. Did you know that homeschoolers are affected by external factors.

You Can Try Do These 5 Daily Practices of Unstressed

We live in an amazing time. Thanks to pioneering people and constantly evolving social constructs, most of us can not only legally educate our children in our own homes, but we can do it in most any way we see fit. Increasingly families are turning to the concept of ‘unschooling’, or free-range learning, as the method most aligned with their family values, structures and schedules.

In deciding to unschool we are committing to trust that we are all capable of learning what we need to learn when we need to learn it, despite unending societal messages to the contrary. Unschooling means a commitment to letting everyone direct their own learning, while also providing a constant influx of enriching opportunities to keep everyone motivated and engaged. It means not allowing complacency or boredom to rob us of vital opportunities for authentic learning. One way to strike the balance is through a daily commitment to five open-ended practices. These practices have the potential to provide a comforting framework which can help families fully relax into the blank canvas of the unschooling life.

    1. Get your game on. Not only will you get increased family connections by making a daily commitment to play a game, you will have the opportunity to teach and model so many other concepts in real time: math, reading, logic, problem solving, and of course the ability to lose graciously. Engagement is the key to authentic and powerful learning and connections = engagement. Setting aside a small block of time to play a game with your kids, giving them your full and undivided attention, is time well spent, and the payoff far exceeds the investment. Board games, card games, games that need no equipment – the opportunities for learning are limitless and easily found. Find what works best in your family, try to set this time aside in your daily routine. Maybe after dinner, before each person gets to go off and spend an hour or so in our own personal free time before bed. In the summer, take the games outdoors and use big body movements. In winter take advantage of the huge array of amazing board games available these days – there are so many more than Monopoly and Life – though both are still great games! A daily commitment to game playing will support engaging conversations and create multiple opportunities to model more refined strategic planning.

 

    1. Create. Making a commitment to create every day can greatly enrich the unschooling experience, while also allowing each person to follow their own passions. Someone who really enjoys creating food has an opportunity to build essential safety skills, practice reading and math, and tinker with chemistry. Art lovers will find concrete ways to share their feelings and emotions, practice a multitude of gross and fine motor skills, and honor and practice intrapersonal skills. And don’t forget to take time to create for yourself as well! It’s important that children see their caregivers making time for and honoring their own creative process, which looks different for every person, but brings solace and comfort to all. Modeling is a powerful teaching and learning tool. The sky is the limit when it comes to creation. Legos, Minecraft, paper dolls from magazines. Visit a retirement home and create some joy. Break out the tools and create a birdhouse. If you can dream it, you can create it. And if you can create it, you can learn from it.

 

    1. Be still and silent. Interestingly enough, this might be the hardest one of all. However, there are no shortage of studies to suggest adding a mindfulness/meditation practice to your day is extremely beneficial. It may be necessary to start very small, but results will show up quickly with dedication. Begin with two minutes of silence and work your way up. One easy way to get started is to take one silent car ride per day. No music, no talking, just looking out at the changing scenery and letting thoughts come and go, noticing them but not acting on them. It will be challenging at first, but a commitment to silence, even for a short while, not only creates a wonderful opportunity to hear our own inner wisdom, it also gives us a powerful tool that we can come back to in times of overwhelm and upset.

 

    1. Write. As a means of self-reflection and exploration, it’s hard to beat writing. Even something as mundane as simply recording the events of the day can not only get your juices flowing, but also provide a treasured memory later on. It doesn’t matter what you write. Depending on the mood, energy level and interests of the day, the time could be used for journaling, letter writing, field guide making, or writing up a daily menu. Set aside a 10-20 minute block each day to write what your hearts dictate. It’s a meditative time, quiet and still. It’s not a time for perfection or overthinking. The emphasis is on putting thoughts and feelings to paper in order to preserve moments and generate ideas.

 

  1. Go outside. If you only take one piece of advice, this is the one. Go outside, even when it’s raining, even when it’s cold. Invest in rain pants, good dry boots and other necessary gear. On days when all you want to do is sit, tell yourself that you will step outside for five minutes only. On some days five minutes may be enough, but on others you may find yourself wanting more. The fresh air clears our minds and Mother Nature soothes our spirits when we forget the simple things. Exercise gets our blood pumping and exploration inspires our souls. Honoring outdoor time is a critical component to health, happiness and learning.

The above guidelines present just one of many possible roadmaps for unschoolers that honors both the slow and easy pace of a self-directed life, while still providing daily opportunities for growth and inspiration. Maybe these five practices don’t resonate with your family, and that’s fine. But taking the time to define three or four or five core values and making a commitment to including them in your daily life will help your family flesh out a routine that soothes the spirit and excites the mind.

Read This Information – When Learning Doesn’t Come Easy

From the moment we find out we are expecting a child, our minds and hearts overflow with hopes and dreams for them. My child will be the most beautiful, brilliant, talented little person to ever walk the Earth, right? And they are that to each of us!

But sometimes, we discover there is a “problem.” The last thing we want to admit is there is something different or wrong with our child. It’s a hard thing to do. Not that we love them any less! But let’s be honest, we would rather sit around other moms and share how our 4 year old can read a chapter book, do multiplication at age 6 and paint like Rembrandt by age 7. Not to mention, they are also on their way to the Olympics in two different sports. Or at least it seems that way when you are the one quietly listening to all the achievements of other people’s children!

So, let’s get a few things straight… Most likely those other moms are exaggerating a wee bit! And there is nothing wrong with your child! Even if your child has a learning disability. She or he simply learns differently than the mainstream! And really, that is kind of cool!

I didn’t always feel that way though. After struggling to teach my daughter to read for 3 years with little progress I was getting pretty frustrated and so was she. Each school session ended in tears and some days started in tears with the mere mention of reading. She had always loved books and being read to and was excited to learn how to read by herself. So, why was it such a struggle? Was I just a bad teacher? Was she too easily distracted and not self motivated enough?

We finally decided to get testing done at age 7. I had noticed a lot of letter and word reversal while reading and writing as well as in math. She complained of her head and eyes hurting when reading (and a vision test found her to have 20/20 eyesight). I needed to know what was holding us back. I knew she was extremely intelligent in so many ways but we were hitting a brick wall. Since we homeschool, we decided to have her tested with a private therapist. It took 4 hours to complete and when finished we were told she had visual and auditory processing disorders.

I then went into mom research mode! And as I read and searched the internet and library, I became more and more confused and overwhelmed! There did not seem to be any truly helpful book or website and those I found seemed to tell me different things! We did decide to go to vision therapy, which of course is not covered by insurance, are any of us surprised? But we felt it was worth a try and worth the money. In therapy, she worked on re-learning phonics using A Time for Phonics. We also did assigned therapy at home. After 6 months she finished and I could definitely see a huge improvement! We did not do auditory therapy with the therapist because of cost, but I did use a program called Earobics for at home. I also found the book, The Out of Sync Child and When the Brain Can’t Hear very helpful.

My search continued to find other ways to help her learn in a way that fit her learning styles. You see, processing disorders and dyslexia do not have to be a roadblock! There are so many ways to learn. The point where I realized this was when I happened to find a book by Ben Foss, The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan. I encourage everyone to read it! Check out his website also! I kind of hate the word accommodations. It makes it sound like you need extra or special help, sort of like you are being allowed to cheat. There should be no shame in learning differently. Figure out what your child’s strengths are and harness those skills. Don’t focus on the standard way most kids are taught to read. I have been so incredibly thankful that we chose to homeschool because my daughter did not have to compare herself to others or be labeled in any way. But even if your child is in public or private school, remember your child is not broken, but the system may be. Advocate for your child to have the resources they need to excel and feel connected.

What resources can you use? Oh, there are so many! This is where I got overwhelmed! I am going to list some of the resources I felt were the best. But look around more and explore the options available!

-Audiobooks are your friend! Don’t get behind learning because you can’t read the material fast enough! If your child learns well by listening, give Audible a try. Amazon has audiobooks as well and so does your local library.
-A reading focus card. You can make your own or buy one. Also try printing your pages on yellow paper, or try other colors other than the usual white.
-Use a text-to-speech app such as Speak It or Talk to Me, and also a speech-to-text app such as Dragon Dictation. Another helpful app is Prizmo, users can scan in any kind of text document and have the program read it out loud, which can be a big help to those who struggle with reading.
-I love Snapwords for learning sitewords! There is also an app for Snapwords now!
-Fonts and background colors: Software that is regularly used in schools, such as Microsoft Word, is a good resource for fonts and background colors. Changing the background color to green, for example, can help with reading as can wearing green glasses. Fonts can also enable reading and understanding; teachers can download free specialist fonts, such as OpenDyslexic, which are free and can run on Microsoft software.
-All About Spelling, this curriculum is great for all children but the multi-sensory approach based on the Orton-Gillingham methods clicked with my daughter! We have not tried All About Reading but I would bet it is a good option.
-We used Rocket Phonics after we had finished vision therapy. It was developed by a dyslexic man, and it is fun! There are many games involved and interesting stories to read, not the usual boring books that are your typical easy reading.
-Math has been a struggle for us as well as reading. Memorizing facts is a challenge. I found a math program that uses learning by association, employing fact and process mnemonics called Semple Math.
-Get HANDS ON! Use clay, paints, blocks, magnets, etc. to practice letters, spelling, and sounds. Learn to write letters correctly first in sand with index finger, then move to writing with a pencil. Make it FUN! Use all the senses!
-Play games! Some we have used and enjoy are Sum Swamp, What’s Gnu?, Scrabble, Very Silly Sentences, Boggle Jr. even card games like addition war (lay down two cards each and add together), or Alphabet Go Fish (you have to say the letter sounds), search Pinterest and the internet for fun games to practice math facts and letter sounds or spelling and sight words. Even if your child is older, there are hands on ideas that are fun and multi-sensory

Moms (and Dads), my point in writing this is to give you some starting points. And to let you know that you are not alone! I know it can be disappointing at first to learn your child is struggling in some way. But it can also feel like a weight has been lifted to know how your child learns and that there are ways to help and empower your little one. I know if you are in a school setting, you will have to explain to your child why they may go to a special class or take tests differently than the other kids. You have to trust yourself to know how to talk to your child. There are books for kids that talk about dyslexia and learning issues in a positive light such as, Thank You, Mr. Falker by Patricia Polacco, The Alphabet War by Diane Robb, and for older children May B by Caroline Rose or Niagra Falls, Or Does It? By Henry Winkler (yes, Fonzie from Happy Days!)

Try to emphasize his/her strengths and affinities and do not simply focus on his/her weaknesses and difficulties. Remind your child that he/she can, indeed, learn but that he/she learns in a unique way, and that is OK! We all are unique and have our own strengths and weaknesses. Love your child for who they are and hopefully, they will find the right tools to make learning soar!